Executive Report 2017 – The State of Play in European Coaching & Mentoring: Coaching Practice

Jonathan Passmore, Hazel Brown, Zoltan Csigas et al

We’d love to share with you some of the finding from the research commissioned by EMCC and undertaken by a team of researchers in 50 countries across Europe.

Passmore, J, Brown, H, Csigas, Z & the European Coaching and Mentoring Research Consortium (2017) The State of Play in European Coaching & Mentoring – Executive Report. Henley-on-Thames: Henley Business School and EMCC International ISBN 978-1-912473-00-7


What is coaching?

Coaching development in Europe has followed its growth in the USA, but it has taken a different pathway reflecting the cultural and national diversity in Europe. We see this as a strength: coaching does not need to be a rigid global framework, but needs to adapt to the cultural context, as much as to the individual and to the presenting issue (topic). In this research we define coaching as:

‘A Socratic-based future-focused dialogue between a facilitator (coach) and a participant (coachee/client), where the facilitator
uses open questions, active listening, summaries and reflections which are aimed at stimulating the self-awareness and personal
responsibility of the participant’. (1)

The respondents in this section were coaches. In the following diagram we asked about how much of their time they spent on coaching clients.

The results confirm most that coaching forms only a part of what most respondents did, spending on average around a third of coaching delivery. Few spent time delivering supervision,  but were engaged in a wide range of other activities.

Next diagram shows the focus of coaching work, with most coaching clients to support improvements in work performance.

In terms of fee rates, the results indicated these varied widely between respondents and varied between individual and corporate coaching assignments.

Responses
The respondents in this section were coaches. They were engaged in a diverse set of activities, typically spending 10-30% of their time on coaching and most commonly supporting clients to improve their performance at work. In terms of fee rates, the results indicated these varied widely between respondents and varied between individual and corporate coaching assignments.


Sources:

1 Passmore, J & Fillery-Travis, A (2011) A critical review of executive coaching research: A decade of progress and what’s to come. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Practice & Research, 4 (2), 70–88